How to choose a sofa?

16 Jul

How to choose a sofa?

From cocktail parties to family movie nights, your sofa works hard and should look great. Besides being the anchor of the room and a functional powerhouse, it’s also a major furniture purchase that requires a lot of research and real-life testing. “Buying a sofa is a big investment, and a well-made one should last generations,” says David Michaud, vice president of New York–based Jonas, a manufacturer of handmade upholstery furniture. “People often buy style over practicality, which is a common mistake.” Whether a sofa’s destined for a public room or a private space, its function—size requirements, lifestyle, and comfort level—and design will set the room’s tone. If you choose well, it’ll be worth the investment. “It should be a piece of furniture that you could pass down to your children,” says Michaud. Here, he offers solid advice to help navigate the process. Grab a seat and read on.

1

Put function first Tailored pieces that are longer offer additional seating for guests, while lounge-y, less structured models with deep cushions are great for curling up with a book. “Envision yourself in the space and how you will use the sofa, then opt for a style that fits those requirements,” says Michaud.

2

Choose your style Ask yourself, “What style do I like?” Midcentury, traditional, French? Use that as a jumping-off point. Here, a living room in the Hamptons by Victoria Hagan has two eight-foot-long casual sofas designed for a beach house. They also work well for entertaining, when you want larger groups to be able to linger in conversation.

3

Consider soft versus firm A plush cushion seat invites people to settle in and relax, while firmer models can withstand wear and tear a little better. “When considering firmness, guests should be comfortable balancing a glass of wine while sitting,” says Michaud. One thing to consider: A cushiony model might mean more time plumping pillows to perfection.

4

Make it work with the decor Sofas can be the superstar of the room, given their silhouette and fabric, or they can be low-key supporting players. “Some people prefer to take a fanciful piece and upholster it in a neutral fabric, while others prefer a tailored design upholstered in a novelty or trendy fabric,” says Michaud. For this Manhattan apartment, Glenn Gissler created a 1940s French modern aesthetic with low sloping scroll arms while mixing a tight back with loose cushions.

5

Look for support A sofa with a high back offers more support for the head and neck. “The majority of sofas support the back only—which most people find adequate,” says Michaud. Another thing to consider: arm style. An architectural or tuxedo style might feature a tighter corner that cradles you.

Source: architecturaldigest.com